Fortnightly links: Who Was in Command, Afghanistan’s deepening migration crisis, 2018 Lowy Institute Poll, and more

A primary school in Bene Warsak Refugee Camp, Afghanistan (Save the Children/Flickr/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
A primary school in Bene Warsak Refugee Camp, Afghanistan (Save the Children/Flickr/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Two out of three women in PNG experience abuse at the hands of an intimate partner, but volunteers are now offering safe havens across Port Moresby.

A new Australian SDGs website was launched in Sydney last week, and is a centralised platform where case studies and examples of action being taken can be shared openly.

Two Fishes is a new podcast out of Fiji exploring “the ideas and stories that make our minds tick”.

The 2018 Lowy Institute Poll shows that on average, Australians think 14% of the federal budget is spent on aid and that this should be reduced to 10%, where in reality aid spending is approximately 0.8%. It also has some interesting findings on how Australians feel about Papua New Guinea.

Who Was in Command is a new website containing data on the names, ranks and command responsibilities of security forces in Nigeria, Egypt and Mexico. IRIN reports on how being able to track personnel helps combat rights abuse.

This podcast by four LSE grad students discusses various aspects of global development, from an interesting variety of perspectives.

In Afghanistan’s deepening migration crisis, the government is trying to help returnees, but the absence of long-term reintegration plans may make the situation even more volatile.

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Sachini Muller

Sachini Muller is a Research Officer at the Development Policy Centre. She is currently completing a Master of Globalisation at ANU.

Terence Wood

Terence Wood is a Research Fellow at the Development Policy Centre. His research includes work on aid policy, the politics of aid, and governance in developing countries.

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