Fortnightly links: micro-credit, revenge post-ISIS, an aging population, and more

There is mounting evidence that micro-credit plays a valuable role in improving the lives of people in need (Credit: PWRDF/Flickr/CC BY 2.0)
There is mounting evidence that micro-credit plays a valuable role in improving the lives of people in need (Credit: PWRDF/Flickr/CC BY 2.0)

If you haven’t already read the devastating ProPublica piece on how an American NGO that was once feted as inspiring, agile and life-changing actually enabled a horrific series of disasters in Liberia, now’s the time to do so.

The ABC has a report on Victorian of the year, Mark Sullivan. Sullivan played a key role in developing a drug to help treat river blindness.

Vox has a handy explainer on what micro-credit can and cannot do.

The New Yorker has a grim report on how the Iraqi government has been exacting revenge post-ISIS.

Japan has been hit hard by an aging population, but Global Policy has three case studies of Japanese cities transforming to meet this challenge.

This Global Health NOW article discusses a report which looks at how conflict affects the education of future medical doctors — and the findings are sobering.

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Terence Wood

Terence Wood is a Research Fellow at the Development Policy Centre. His research focuses on political governance in Western Melanesia, and Australian and New Zealand aid.

Sachini Muller

Sachini Muller is a Research Officer at the Development Policy Centre. She is currently completing a Master of Globalisation at ANU.

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